Plato, Pythagoras, and Stichometry

In Stichting Pythagoras Pythagoras Foundation Newsletter. No.15. December 2010. Plato, Pythagoras, and Stichometry §1. Introduction We know little of Plato the man and everything we need of Plato the philosopher. His name appears in the dialogues only three times, twice connected with Socrates’ trial and once with the day of his death. That is all. Continue Reading …

Ion scholarship

    Guthrie (1962) Section 1. Although many scholars in the past have regarded it as spurious, Guthrie reports that today few doubt that it is Plato’s own work, written somewhere between Socrates’ death in 399 and 391, most probably between 394 and 391. This is followed by an explanation of the term ‘rhapsode’ and Continue Reading …

Humanities and the Liberal Arts

Cambridge College—Humanities and the Liberal Arts DRAFT THIS DOCUMENT IS NOT FOR DISTRIBUTION AT THIS TIME. The following statements are only suggestive but they might be helpful in creating a unity, binding together the various components (or courses) making up a program in the Humanities. They are intended to be universal and are equally applicable Continue Reading …

In Memory of Chandler Steiner

Memorial for Chandler Steiner on Sunday, 10 October 2004 at Cambridge College, Cambridge, Mass. John Bremer We are all here to honor our friend Chandler Steiner, and my own affectionate tribute falls into three parts – remembering, regretting, and rejoicing. First, for remembering. In 1971, I was the Academic Dean of Newton College of the Continue Reading …

Mathematics: esp. Greek

coming soon

Xenophon’s World

Published in The World & I, November 1992 Xenophon’s World Through one of the many narrow streets of ancient Athens a very handsome—but nevertheless modest and unassuming—young man was returning home with produce from the market. An ugly, bug-eyed man of about sixty coming toward him with the gait of a pelican raised his staff Continue Reading …

Incommensurability

Incommensurability   Incommensurability means “without a common measure” or “not having a common measure.” It may seem a strange thought that there could be, for example, two straight lines, or two geometrical figures (as another example) which could not be measured by a common unit. But it is so, as we shall see.   When Continue Reading …

Multitude, Magnitude, and Metaphor

An exposition of Euclid’s theory of proportion. 1958

The Panathenaea and the Structure of Homer’s Iliad

August 2008

The Mistress of C.S. Lewis

Published in Sleuthing C.S. Lewis  by Kathryn Lindskoog, 2001, pp.312-321 THE MISTRESS OF C.S. LEWIS by John Bremer The relationship between C. S. Lewis (or Jack) and Janie Moore (or Minto) began shortly after 7 June 1917 and ended with the death of Janie Moore on 12 January 1951. The relationship undoubtedly changed its character Continue Reading …